Society
Voting Rights For Blacks And Poor Whites In The Jim Crow South
Written by Dr. Russell Brooker PhD   
Friday, 29 January 2021 00:00

From about 1900 to 1965, most African Americans were not allowed to vote in the South. This was especially true in the Deep South: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

White people in power used many methods to keep African Americans from voting. Some of these methods also prevented poor white people from voting.

Eight Ways People Were Kept From Voting:

1) Violence: Blacks who tried to vote were threatened, beaten, and killed. Their families were also harmed. Sometimes their homes were burned down. Often, they lost their jobs or were thrown off their farms.

Whites used violence to intimidate blacks and prevent them from even thinking about voting. Still, some blacks passed the requirements to vote and took the risk. Some whites used violence to punish those “uppity” people and show other blacks what would happen to them if they voted.

2) Literacy tests: Today almost all adults can read. One hundred years ago, however, many people – black and white – were illiterate. Most illiterate people were not allowed to vote. A few were allowed if they could understand what was read to them. White officials usually claimed that whites could understand what was read. They said blacks could not understand it, even when they clearly could.

Read more...
 
The Hate U Give: Film Review
Written by Kam Williams   
Monday, 22 October 2018 20:50

 

Amandla Stenberg Stars in Adaptation of Searing, Inner City Saga



16 year-old Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) straddles two different worlds which never intersect, one, black and poor, the other, white and privileged. That's because she lives in the ghetto in Garden Heights, but her parents (Regina Hall and Russell Hornsby) have sent her to Williamson, an exclusive prep school located on the other side of the tracks.

They know that Williamson gives her a better chance of making it out of the 'hood than the local public high school which is only good for girls who want to get “high, pregnant or killed.” Consequently, Starr uses slang when hanging out with her friends on the block, although she always talks properly around her classmates.

Read more...
 
Thoughts about the movie Wonder
Written by Patricia Turnier   
Monday, 27 August 2018 20:52

Wonder released last year became a blockbuster. The movie raised more than $300 million worldwide and Oscar winner Julia Roberts is one of the main actresses. The story (based on the best-selling novel of the same title by R.J. Palacio) is about August Pullman, a young boy played by the amazing Canadian actor Jacob Tremblay. Pullman was raised in upper Manhattan, New York. He has a rare medical facial disease called Treacher Collins syndrome. 

Read more...
 
About Black America: "Focus"
Written by Dr. Brooks Robinson PhD   
Thursday, 17 May 2018 00:00

There has been opposition, no doubt. But, after over 400 years in America, it seems that Black Americans should have achieved greater progress. Why do we continue to find ourselves to be the brunt of jokes and the victims of violence that goes unchecked and unavenged? Yes, “vengeance is mine, saith the Lord.” But the Lord is distant, and he endowed us with the tools to use to look after ourselves as an adult people.

Why do we find ourselves in this predicament today? We place the matter squarely at the source: leadership. Yes, some Black American leaders have had good plans to move our cause forward. Others have not. In either case, the proof is in the pudding. We are where we are because our collective and individual leadership is found to be lacking. The leadership has been unscientific.

What would sound and scientific leadership prescribe? Keep it simple stupid; keep it focused!

Read more...
 
Black Pain: A Book Review
Written by Kam Williams   
Friday, 11 May 2018 00:00

 

"How much does suffering from and living with addiction, incarceration, dirty neighborhoods, HIV, hypertension, violence, racism, and class discrimination make us vulnerable to depression in the Black community? How many of us are suffering from it and not able or willing to acknowledge it? Who is talking about it? What is our response? The silence is deafening.

Depression is a fact of Black life, but it doesn't have to be a curse. And we don't have to be ashamed to admit it. This book will speak openly about my own depression and share the experiences of other people, from celebrities to regular working folk, so that we can think in different ways about this condition and about our options as Black people for dealing with it. More than anything, I want to open a dialogue. I want to give a voice to our pain and name it so we can make a space for our healing."

--Excerpted from the Introduction (pages xxvi-xxvii)

African-American females are generally undervalued by this society, despite all the selfless sacrifices they routinely make at home, at work and in the community. Besides being overworked, they're expected to behave like ever-available, accommodating sex machines or else risk being dismissed as undesirable and unfeminine.

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 6