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Black Pain: A Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Kam Williams   
Friday, 11 May 2018 00:00

 

"How much does suffering from and living with addiction, incarceration, dirty neighborhoods, HIV, hypertension, violence, racism, and class discrimination make us vulnerable to depression in the Black community? How many of us are suffering from it and not able or willing to acknowledge it? Who is talking about it? What is our response? The silence is deafening.

Depression is a fact of Black life, but it doesn't have to be a curse. And we don't have to be ashamed to admit it. This book will speak openly about my own depression and share the experiences of other people, from celebrities to regular working folk, so that we can think in different ways about this condition and about our options as Black people for dealing with it. More than anything, I want to open a dialogue. I want to give a voice to our pain and name it so we can make a space for our healing."

--Excerpted from the Introduction (pages xxvi-xxvii)

African-American females are generally undervalued by this society, despite all the selfless sacrifices they routinely make at home, at work and in the community. Besides being overworked, they're expected to behave like ever-available, accommodating sex machines or else risk being dismissed as undesirable and unfeminine.

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Invisible Ink: A Book Review Print E-mail
Written by Kam Williams   
Monday, 22 January 2018 00:00

 
“It has always been a struggle for the relatively few African-Americans in corporate America who do exist, and it is made all the more difficult because we tend to operate in isolation. We are nearly always alone, with no one to fall back on... as we deal daily with an unending stream of slights real and imagined.
 
Even those who do care don't really understand. This is all played out in an environment where we are subjected to a debilitating undercurrent of bias that too many, on both sides of the divide, pretend does not exist...
 
The point of this book is not that the world is an awful place where things never go right but that institutional racism is a virus that is alive and well and needs to be eradicated if fundamental fairness is to be achieved. Black lives matter, and we must take issue and demand change, whether these lives are literally snuffed out in the blink of an eye or figuratively snuffed out in the polite confines of corporate America.”
 
-- Excerpted from the Prologue (page xiii) and Epilogue (page 199)
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If You Had Controlling Parents Print E-mail
Written by Dr. Dan Neuharth Ph.D   
Thursday, 02 November 2017 00:00

Smothering Parenting: Life Under a Microscope

Slight, porcelain-skinned Margaret, a 33-year-old attorney specializing in family law, grew up with a lawyer father who loved heated discussions, always insisting Margaret argue with him and defend her positions. Unfortunately, he never allowed her to win, badgering her until she capitulated.

At age nine, Margaret began reading a book about a veterinarian, which her father covertly confiscated since he wanted her to be a doctor, not a vet. When Margaret asked where the book went, her father responded, “What book?” When she was 12, Margaret developed a taste for bland foods — vanilla ice cream, white bread and potatoes — so her father endlessly shoved the spicy foods he preferred under her nose. As 16-year-old Margaret was writing her college-application essays, her father grabbed them, read them disapprovingly, sat down at the kitchen table and rewrote them. When 17-year-old Margaret was packing for college, her father began yanking clothes out of her suitcase, telling her exactly what and how to pack.

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Racist America Print E-mail
Written by Dr. Joe Feagin PhD   
Sunday, 19 March 2017 18:10

Profiting from Discrimination:  White Benefits, Black Losses

The prominent Harvard law professor, Derrick Bell, once concluded that a major function of antiBlack discrimination is ''to facilitate the exploitation of Black labor, to deny us access to benefits and opportunities that otherwise would be available, and to blame all the manifestations of exclusion-bred despair on the asserted inferiority of the victims. Racial discrimination in employment often involves an exploitative relationship that enables White employers to take more of the value of the labor of workers of color than of comparable White workers.  Today, as in the past, some employers pay Black workers less because they are Black.  They do this directly, or they do it by segregating Black workers into certain job categories and setting the pay for these categories lower than for predominantly White job classifications.  The Marxist tradition has accented their way in which capitalist employers routinely take part of the value or workers' labor for their own purposes -- thus not paying workers for the full value of that work. Similarly, in numerous situations White employers have the power, because of subtly or blatantly institutionalized discrimination, to take additional value from the labor of Black workers and other workers of color, such as in the form of paying lower wages.

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The Many Costs of Racism Print E-mail
Written by Dr. Joe R. Feagin and Dr. Karyn D. McKinney   
Tuesday, 24 January 2017 00:00

A racist society is not a healthy society, for the perpetrators of racial discriminatiion as well as for the targets of that discrimination.  In an earlier book, Joe Feagin and his colleagues argued that all Americans have paid a heavy price for continuing racism:

Racist notions have brought ill-gotten resources and benefits to many white Americans. Yet few whites realize the heavy price that they, their families, and their communities have paid and will pay for this institutionalized racism. White Americans have paid greatly in the form of their ignorance and fears, in human contributions and achievements sacrified, in the failure to create a just and egalitarian society, in the resistance and lashing out of the opressed, and in the fundamental ideals and egalitarian morality thus betrayed.  In our view, U.S. society certainly cannot afford white racism in the long run, for it may well destroy this society as we know it sometime in this century.

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